July 5th marks the 70th anniversary of the National Health Service (NHS), launched in 1948 by the-then health secretary, Aneurin Bevan As the first universal healthcare system developed after the Second World War, for the first time, hospitals, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, opticians and dentists were brought together under one umbrella organisation to provide services that are free for all at the point of delivery. In the UK, the NHS is still considered the proudest achievement of modern society, regarded as an iconic symbol of the values of fairness and equity.

 Over the last 70 years, the NHS has transformed the health and wellbeing of the nation and become the envy of the world. It has delivered huge medical advances and improvements to public health, meaning we can all expect to live longer lives.

It is thanks to the NHS that we have all but eradicated diseases such as polio and diphtheria, and pioneered new treatments like the world’s first liver, heart and lung transplant. Day to day exceptional care is provided.

Despite challenges, the NHS continues to evolve providing access to the latest technologies and advances in treatment, adopting innovation and partnership to provide services that are free for all at the point of delivery.

At The Thornbury Radiosurgery Centre we are proud to work in partnership with the Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust providing one of two NHS England National Centres of Excellence for stereotactic radiosurgery, an advanced form of radiotherapy, providing specialist care and support for patients including those with rare and complex conditions from across the North of England.

The NHS turning 70 is the perfect opportunity to thank the extraordinary staff delivering services for NHS patients- without their skill, dedication and compassion, none of this would be possible.